30 Jun 2013

Chinese Symbol Tattoos

Chinese Symbol Tattoos
Chinese Symbol Tattoos

If I could read Chinese symbol tattoos then I would explain to you what the symbols in this picture mean. But, since I don’t have an inkling about what these Chinese symbol tattoos mean then I will have to go on about how I wanted one of these designs when I was a child. When I was about eight years old, I was simply fascinated with martial art movies. Every chance I could get, I would head to the theatre and watch three of them in a row during the dollar show.

And then I discovered the television series starring David Carradine called ‘Kung Fu" I absolutely loved that show. But, I loved it not because of the plot, which could sometimes be slow, or because of the occasional fight scene. No, I loved Kung Fu because of the cool way that he got the tattoos on his arm. He had to pick up a burning cauldron with his forearms, which burned a tiger on one arm and a dragon on the other arm. That is the closest I think I have ever come to Chinese symbol tattoos. Of course, that may not help you out but it does make an interesting story.

8 May 2013

Chinese Tattoo

Chinese Tattoo
Chinese Tattoo

Here lately there has been a growing interest in Chinese tattoos. Chinese tattoos are often made up of characters called logograms which simply means a character that represents a word. A reported 6,000 of these ‘hanzi’ characters make up the writing system for the Chinese language. the hanzi characters are said to have been invented by an official in the court of the legendary Emperor Huangdi in 2600 BC named Cangjie. Written in columns, the Chinese characters are read from top to bottom, and from right to left.

Most of the characters are pictographically phonetic compounds, meaning that they’re used for their sounds instead of their meaning. Although Mandarin and Cantonese are two distinct languages, the writing system for each is the same. While pronunciation may be a barrier from one language to the other, the Chinese writing system has remained faithful since ancient times. In addition, many Chinese characters were adopted according to their meaning by the Japanese and Korean languages to represent native words, disregarding pronunciation altogether. So, if you’re looking to have a favorite phrase or word tattooed on your body, think about getting a Chinese tattoo. Chinese tattoos add style and flair to any collection of body ink.

1 Feb 2013

Chinese Symbol Tattoos

Chinese Symbol Tattoos
Chinese Symbol Tattoos

I have seen a lot of tattoos that were stunningly lovely to look at, and some of those are Asian tattoos with a lot of chinese symbol tattoos blended in with them. I have always been mesmerized by the mystic Asian culture since I was a very small boy, and when I see something that looks Asian to me, I just have to find out what there meanings are and their history. So many of the Chinese people along the coast of china wear a lot of chinese symbol tattoos compared to the Chinese farmers further inside the country.

I have no idea why, but when I spent some time over in China back in the early nineties, I traveled quite extensively in all areas, and the people along the coast had many more tattoos than anywhere else in the country.

It could be that in the past so much trading along the coast brought distant travelers from abroad, bringing their tattoos with them, and that might have made a big impression on the coastal people. Some of the nicest tattoos you will ever see are the chinese symbol tattoos that they use in Taiwan. They have more color and they are used with a lot of grace and they are beautiful right down to the finest detail. A lot of people think that chinese symbol tattoos have to be black and that they are just letters or words, that is not true, there are many that tell a story, and they are beautiful with lots of bright colors.

31 Mar 2012

Chinese Tattoo

Chinese Tattoo
Chinese Tattoo

Chinese tattoos started to become popular during the 1970s. That’s when what I call the ‘Asian Invasion’ started. First came the martial art movies. Americans became obsessed with these low budget productions that started as a part of Hong Kong film making. When Bruce Lee became a star in Hollywood, people all over the United States started consuming mass quantities of these Asian action flicks. As a result people began becoming interested in Asian martial arts, particularly Kung Fu and Karate. Membership in ‘dojos’ began to skyrocket.

Then people started getting all kinds of Chinese tattoos inked into their skin. First came the ones that were associated with whatever branch of martial art the bearer belonged to. Then people started to get Chinese tattoos that meant things like ‘Courage"m ‘Freedom" and "Honor". Now, people get Chinese tattoos that have all kinds of meanings. From a favorite phrase to the names of their children. Chinese tattoos have revolutionized the tattoo world in much the same way as Kung Fu movies revolutionized the movie industry. If you want a Chinese tattoo then pick a name or phrase that you like and start the ink flowing. These are beautiful and impressive designs.

11 Jan 2012

Chinese Tattoos

Chinese Tattoos
Chinese Tattoos

It’s fascinating how popular Chinese tattoos are in the United States. But, what’s really fascinating is the fact that a lot of people in China look down on Chinese tattoos. Yes, you heard me right. There are very few Asians who would consider getting a Chinese tattoo. It’s simply not done. They are more likely to get symbols of animals or flowers then they are to get a Chinese tattoo. As a matter of fact, a lot of them look down on Westerners who get their language inked on them.

But, if you really want to warrant a chuckle then tell a person from China that a Chinese tattoo is a work of art. They would most likely laugh their butt off. Why is that you ask? Well, it’s really quite simple. Would you get the name of your dog inked into your arm in English and without any decoration and call the word a work of art? Of course you wouldn’t. Chinese tattoos may seem exotic and beautiful to us but they are just words to someone from China. This is just a little food for thought for you ink seekers out there.

1 Apr 2011

Chinese Tattoos

Chinese Tattoos
Chinese Tattoos

If you put some thought into it you can probably think of someone who is sporting a Chinese tattoo. I know that I can name at least three people that I am personally acquainted with. Probably, seven or more people if I add celebrities to that list. And I can see why Chinese tattoos are popular. They do look really good. But, there is also a dark side to Chinese tattoos that you need to be aware of. The two most common problems are poor translations and inaccurate translations. These may seem like one and the same to you but they really aren’t.

Poor translation Chinese tattoos include things such as someone who thinks that they are getting a phrase like "freedom" when actually they are receiving something that means "Cheap". Inaccurate translations are things that are hard to translate from English to the symbol driven language. Philosophical concepts such as divinity may be very hard to translate into a Chinese tattoo design. So make sure that you find someone who is a native speaker of the language to compose the design for you. And then make sure that you find a qualified artist to do the ink. Trust me, you’ll thank me for heeding this advise.

18 May 2010

Chinese Names Tattoos

Chinese Names Tattoos
Chinese Names Tattoos

A growing trend in the world of tattooing is having your name name of your loved one translated into a Chinese name tattoo. Chinese name tattoos can be a great way to add a little pizazz to your name or the name of a loved one. These tattoo designs can appear exotic, but they are not without their risk.

If you are thinking about getting a Chinese name tattoo make sure that you find someone who speaks the language fluently. You don’t want to end up getting the wrong name or something that isn’t even a name inked accidentally.

This could cause a great deal of embarrassment and may make you the subject among many native speakers.

And don’t think that you can depend on an online translator or your tattoo artist to help you design your Chinese name tattoo. Online translators are notorious for getting translations wrong and your local tattoo artist probably doesn’t speak the language. So if you want to get a Chinese name design make sure that you do it right and find a person or a reliable source to give you the information that you need to have the Chinese name tattoo inked correctly the first time.